Tag Archive: #BestResponse

#BestResponse Project: Phase 2

In my ongoing quest to vanquish the plethora of “Don’t Ever Say This” posts, I’m on a mission from God to craft some stock responses to the questions and comments that foster and adoptive parents hear all too often.

Last week, I asked you, my brilliant readers, to let me know what questions/comments you get often enough that you’d like to have a snappy retort in your back pocket. And boy did y’all deliver!! My facebook page hasn’t seen that much action since…

well….

since ever, honestly.

Phase 2 is for y’all to vote on which ones you want us to work on first. You can vote for as many as you want, but you can only vote once. You can also add any other comments/questions you want us to work on.


I’ve think I already know which one I want to work on first – but I need y’all to pick the next one.

And since you’re here anyway, scroll on down and click to banner to vote for me. 🙂

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Hint:
It has recently come to my attention that not all of my readers can easily tell when I’m being sarcastic. That is truly unfortunate, so finding a solution was imperative. ^Obviously, the easiest answer is to assume that if something can be read with sarcasm, it should be;^; but that’s not really workable, I guess. After reviewing several options for a “sarcasm font”, I’ve come up up with my own system. Whenever you see italics inside carrots (^snark^), that is my “sarcasm font”.

♥♥ ♫♫We have a project♫♫ ♥♥

I’ve been thinking recently about all the comments we all get all the time – and how I wish I just had a standard response in my back pocket.

I guess I need two standard responses ~~ one sarcastic (because, duh), and one positive and graceful in case I feel open to discussing my family and the commenter seems to be coming from a positive place.

And I realized that I have brilliant readers who get THE.SAME.COMMENTS. So we’re going to do this together (I hope).

First, let’s come up with a list of the comments we get and for which we’d like to have a good response.

Once we have a good list, we’ll tackle them one at a time:
  1. I’ll do something witty/sarcastic to let you know which question we’re working on.
  2. You come up with responses to the question ~ either witty/sarcastic or positive and grace-filled, or both. 🙂
  3. I’ll figure out a way to make a contest out of it ~ with prizes and everything!!
So I think the best way to do this is for everyone to post their responses on facebook ~ that way other readers can “Like” which comments they agree with ~ this will tell me which one we should tackle first (it will also be the basis for the contest). 😉
 
So head over to the facebook post to give me your suggestions for comments/questions that you wish you had an automatic standard response in your back pocket. (Don’t be shy, there will be prizes involved!)
 
To be clear ~ I am only looking for the comments/questions themselves right now – save your responses for later.

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Hint:
It has recently come to my attention that not all of my readers can easily tell when I’m being sarcastic. That is truly unfortunate, so finding a solution was imperative. ^Obviously, the easiest answer is to assume that if something can be read with sarcasm, it should be;^; but that’s not really workable, I guess. After reviewing several options for a “sarcasm font”, I’ve come up up with my own system. Whenever you see italics inside carrots (^snark^), that is my “sarcasm font”.

5 Things You SHOULD Say to a Foster Parent

Lately I’ve been seeing A LOT of articles along the lines of “Don’t EVER Say These 10 Things to a Pregnant Woman” and “10 Things You’d Better NEVER say to a Mom of Boys”. When I first started seeing lists like this, they were primarily witty and focused on “funny because it’s true”. At some point, they seemed to become kind of bitter and convey the idea that “you can communicate with me ONLY on the following terms.”

This weekend I’ve made a couple of birthday resolutions that basically amount to focusing my energy more on positive things, rather than emphasizing the negative. So in this post I want to flip this “things you should never say” trend around. Instead, I’d like to suggest
5 Things You SHOULD Say to a Foster Parent

1.     You have a beautiful family.

Because our family composition can change quickly, and because our families don’t always all “match”, we are accustomed to getting a lot of strange looks – and our share of rude questions. But acknowledgment that our family is beautiful – no matter how different – is appreciated. An added bonus – if you approach us this way, we’re more likely to be willing to answer your questions about our kids and foster care – assuming the questions are appropriate. And if you do ask something inappropriate, we’re less likely to be offended if you started out with complimenting our family. 
2.     I would be happy to get fingerprinted and background checked so I can babysit for you.
The nature of the foster care system means that nothing is ever simple – this is especially true with babysitters. As much as we appreciate an offer to give us a break, most foster families aren’t allowed to leave the foster kids with anyone who hasn’t been background-screened and approved by Child Services. If you’re willing and able to do this, please let a foster family know. 
3.     What you do is important and necessary.
Almost every foster family I know has had someone in their life who has been at least unsupportive, if not outright hostile, about the decision to foster. We don’t want to hear that we’re saints or that you could never do what we do. But it is nice to occasionally have it acknowledged that what we’re doing matters. 
4.     I can only begin to imagine how hard and rewarding it is to be a foster parent.
Again, we don’t want to hear that we’re saints or how you wouldn’t be able to let them go. But, acknowledgment that what we do is hard is nice to hear. Especially when it’s accompanied with acknowledgment that it’s also rewarding. (^Hint: We also don’t want to hear that you understand exactly how we feel because you foster cats, and that’s basically the same thing.^)
5.     How can I pray for you?
It may not be immediately obvious what our prayer needs are, but we definitely need your prayers! As an example, when Lady Bug was reunified with her dad, several people told us they would pray that she came back to us quickly. However, the prayers we really wanted were that her dad would do what he needed to do to make sure Lady Bug never needed to be in foster care again. 

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Hint:
It has recently come to my attention that not all of my readers can easily tell when I’m being sarcastic. That is truly unfortunate, so finding a solution was imperative. ^Obviously, the easiest answer is to assume that if something can be read with sarcasm, it should be;^; but that’s not really workable, I guess. After reviewing several options for a “sarcasm font”, I’ve come up up with my own system. Whenever you see italics inside carrots (^snark^), that is my “sarcasm font”.

If you like what you just read please click to send a quick vote for me on Top Mommy Blogs- The best mommy blog directory featuring top mom bloggers

Best Response to: Unsolicited (and uninformed) Medical Advice

From Jackie:

My adopted son has ADHD and I’ve had to deal with quite a few people who have some seriously strong opinions on how I should be treating the condition. 
They seem to believe they are qualified, medical professionals based on some random article they read on the Internet.

And they think my child’s medical decisions should be their business too. 
Um, no. From now on I plan to respond with:
^Sure you can have input into my son’s medical treatment. Just as soon as I see the results of your last physical. 

Oh, what’s that you say? Your medical records are personal? 

Yep, so are my son’s.^

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Hint:
It has recently come to my attention that not all of my readers can easily tell when I’m being sarcastic. That is truly unfortunate, so finding a solution was imperative. ^Obviously, the easiest answer is to assume that if something can be read with sarcasm, it should be^; but that’s not really workable, I guess. After reviewing several options for a “sarcasm font”, I’ve come up up with my own system. Whenever you see italics inside carrots (^snark^), that is my “sarcasm font”.

If you like what you just read please click to send a quick vote for me on Top Mommy Blogs- The best mommy blog directory featuring top mom bloggers